Quilting Arts at PSCSA

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Quilted Portraits by Participants of The Quilting Arts Class

Today marked the culminating event for the Quilting Arts class at The Park Slope Center for Successful Aging.  It was a lovely celebration, and a proud moment for myself, the co instructors, and the participants.  Sadly, we did miss a few of our key members due to travel and illness, and wanted to make sure that Suzanne and Gladys know that they were missed!

The portraits above are now hung in the center in groupings of 6, on either side of the stage, which is a focus of the center.

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PSCSA- You can see the portraits hanging in the distance!

We even caught up with Jenny P, who was especially excited about her portrait’s extra “bling”. (top right)

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Jenny and Instructor Coleen Scott. Photo by Cyndi Freeman

The center looked great decorated with our quilts, the special magazine made by Coleen for the event, and the amazing cake provided by catering, complete with a picture of our most intricate quilt!

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Co-Instructor Cyndi Freeman with Nine Patch quilts.

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Lead teaching artist Coleen Scott with the Hawaiian style quilt.


The beautiful sheet cake by catering with our quilt printed on it!

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Sisters Lily and Irene excited about “Q is for Quilting”, the magazine about our project.

After five months of hard work, we are so proud of what we have accomplished together.  It was a little bit bittersweet leaving today, as we will miss our beloved participants, and hope to work with them again soon.  Huge thanks to the New York City Council, the NYC Department of Aging, the Department of Cultural Affairs, the Brooklyn Arts Council, Heights and Hills, and especially, the staff and members of The Park Slope Center for Successful Aging.  It’s been wonderful!

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Co-Instructors Cyndi Freeman and Dottie McCoy work with Irene and Lily to finish framing our quilted portraits the day before our culminating event.

Please visit The Park Slope Center for Successful Aging (7th Ave and 7th Street in Park Slope, Brooklyn) to see our work hanging in the center, and for more information, or interest in Quilting classes with older people at your center, please visit http://www.coleenscottdesign.com for contact info!


Q is For Quilting!

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We are proud to announce the culminating event of our SU-CASA grant project at The Park Slope Center for Successful Aging, 463a 7th St. at 7th Avenue in Brooklyn,  THIS FRIDAY from 1:30-3 PM.

We will be presenting the three finished quilts we have made, as well as twelve individual art quilt portraits of participating older persons, framed to hang in the center and provide beautiful decoration!

Below, find a link to our magazine (below the cover image) explaining the program, the projects and quilting techniques that you might like to try yourself!

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Hawaiian Quilt full crop

For more information, and to attend this event, please see the flyer below:

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If you’re in Brooklyn, we hope you can make it, and if you’re not, we hope you find our magazine inspiring!


The Pastie Project is COMING!


In the coming months, we will be sharing links to our research for a book on the history of pasties and the evolution of their construction over the years.  It will be a tribute to our love of the burlesque community and to the importance of burlesque as a part of theater history.  In the meantime, please visit the burlesque hall of fame‘s website, and donate to the expansion of the museum!

Elegantly Pastied – a brief history of striptease and the emergence of the nipple pastie!

This is a great piece on the history of Pasties-read it!

Lipstick, Powder and Paint

Here’s a little guest blog I wrote fro lingerie brand Playful Promises recently🙂

mirandaPasties, and their whimsical cousin the nipple tassel, are the decorative body accessory du jour. Usually associated with burlesque performers, they’ve recently been spotted on the likes of Miley Cyrus, Rhianna and Nicki Minaj, marking an explosion in their popularity since they were originally brought back into mainstream consciousness by likes of the lovely Dita Von Teese in the 90’s. But don’t be fooled – they’ve been around a lot longer than that, and have a history intertwined with  art, censorship, moral outrage and cultural paradigm shifts…read on to discover more about the history of the humble pastie.

Most people with an interest in cabaret history will know that burlesque wasn’t always about the art of striptease – in fact its roots are more in a British music hall tradition of comedy, satire and song. …

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QUILTING CLASS at the Prospect Hill Senior Center- A Story about Volunteering

Our quilting class at the Prospect Hill Senior Center

Our quilting class at the Prospect Hill Senior Center

Since July, I have had the pleasure of volunteering with some of the wonderful senior citizens at The Prospect Hill Senior Center in Brooklyn, New York.  I have always been around senior citizens, from the time I was a young child.  My parents and grandparents were part of The Elks Lodge, and we went camping monthly with The Roving Elks, a motorhome group of mostly seniors.  I was always very close to all four of my grandparents, and after losing my last grandpa at the beginning of this year, I have really felt the gap in my life and my heart, where the seniors are missing.  Probably because of my close relationships with my grandparents, I love seniors, and have been searching for an opportunity to work with them for years.  After a guest storytelling opportunity given to me by my good friend, professional storyteller and actress, Cyndi Freeman, I was hooked, and began brainstorming ways to get more involved with the wonderful people I had met.  Cyndi felt the same way, and was excited to continue working with these seniors she had built relationships with.

In July, 2015, we (Cyndi and I) sat down with Crystal and Carla at Prospect Hill Senior Center, for a programming meeting, and decided that a quilting class would be a great way to go.  We had to emphasize that we were interested in volunteering, and we made a small budget, and began thinking of other ways to get supplies we needed.

Now, I am a costume designer by trade, and a costume instructor at a private school in Brooklyn, so teaching sewing comes very easily, but quilting is a skill that I learned from my mother.  My mom Gayle Scott, is an avid quilter and artist.  She has been making quilts of all kinds for over 15 years now, and participates actively in the Quilting Guild in her city, Redding, California.

Over the years, I have learned many different techniques and tricks about quilting from my mom.  I’ve taken workshops with her, learned through practice while sewing on visits home to Redding, California, and I’ve spent hours with her quilting friends sewing at the community center Thursday sewing group.  I would consider myself a novice quilter and an expert seamstress.  I tend to enjoy the design process and the act of putting things together over the tedium of cutting pieces perfectly, or doing intricate handwork like applique’.  My mom has done it all, and so have most of her friends.  They are a talented bunch, and they are a joyful, and generous group of ladies.

Japanese Style Quilt with hand embroidered blocks by Gayle Scott

Japanese Style Quilt with Hand embroidered blocks by Gayle Scott

Original Photo by Ben Trivett

Photo Slice Art Quilt by Gayle Scott and 3 Redding CA, Art Quilters

I suppose it should have come as no surprise that when Cyndi and I were approved for this quilting class, the ladies of the Redding Thursday Group jumped at the opportunity to clean out their fabric scraps, and donated all of the fabric to get our class started.  Not only did they donate the fabric, but they cut all the fabric into 4″ squares for us.  Thousands of 4″ squares were then packed into priority mail packages along with some fabric yardage to back quilts, and all was mailed directly to me for use in our projects.  Mom and I made a plan of ways to make quilts with beginners, and through her experience, we designed accessible projects that would help everyone learn the basics, and help them feel like they had the opportunity to design.  We also made a plan to have layout boards for those who may not be able to sew, but wanted to participate.  I cannot express the gratitude I have for those women’s generosity, and for their enthusiasm about this project.  I know that they are still ready to send a whole new batch of fabric whenever we are ready for more.  Truly, the program could not have happened without them, and it has kept us going now for months.  We have finished four quilts, and tens of other small projects like tote bags, pillows, pin cushions, and pot holders- all made from the squares they sent.

We are still going strong over at Prospect Hill, and will finish this time with them at the end of December.  We hope to move to another center in the new year through June, possibly with funding from BAC in a special grant for senior arts programs.  We truly look forward to meeting new seniors and working with some of our new friends from PHSS who recommended this new space to us.  We will always have a love for that center, and hope to return there with more programming as well.

I am so grateful to my mother for teaching me the basic quilting skills I have, for being the doer that she is, and for organizing and helping me plan this course from afar.  Her creativity and generosity is unparalleled, and I am so lucky and thankful for her in my life.  Soon, California will connect directly with New York, and mom will be a guest in our quilting class in Brooklyn, on her visit in the new year.

Here is a video of the seniors having fun, and chatting about class- you can see by the smiles on their faces, that they are as happy as we are to be quilting together.

Quilts made by seniors in the Quilting Class at Prospect Hill Senior Center

Quilts made by seniors in the Quilting Class at Prospect Hill Senior Center

The bottom line is this: volunteering is good for your soul.  I feel connected to senior citizens, but maybe you feel connected to children, or animals, the homeless, or the sick.  The point is, it feels good to give back to the community, and it feels even better if you can share something you love with others, without stress, without pretense, and without any reason other than to create for the joy of it.  I highly recommend it.


We were asked to help create a creepy gif to show to the people at FX.  We had a great time making our friend Nishell Falcone into a victim of The Strain .  Photos for the gif by Ben Trivett.  Thanks to the people at Sideways Advertising for the fun opportunity!


Institute Magazine Editorial Shoot!

We are so excited to share Institute Magazine’s feature of an editorial shoot we did with the wonderful photographer Pieke Roelofs!  Click Here to view!

Also, check out Pieke’s behind the scenes video from her site, PhotoandGrime.com

From Institute Magazine, Photos by Pieke Roelofs

From Institute Magazine, Photos by Pieke Roelofs

Youth Now: Live Forever!

We’ve been working on our brief for i-D Magazine.  The title was “Youth Now!” and we wanted to share our thoughts and some of our final images.  Model: Emma Mannheimer, Photos by Ben Trivett.  Makeup, Hair, Styling by Coleen Scott.

This is a side by side comparison of the same image of Emma in black and white and color. Image creation was inspired by the style of Daniel Jackson, the assigned photographer for the brief.

STATEMENT OF INTENT: I’m looking for the coolest young people I know, and hoping to make believable, interesting, optimistic, sexy images, full of life and vigor, full of the motivation to change the world in their own individual way. The concept is clean, minimal makeup, showcasing natural beauty, and showcasing each models’ original look and style. If color is used, it will be unconventionally, trading the stereotype of red lips and blue eye makeup for just the opposite. Red lipstick on the eyes and blue on the lips, symbolizing individuality, rebellion from the norm.  Our friend Emma is the embodiment of the hopeful side of youth now.  She’s a mover and shaker, and we’re excited to see what she does next.  We’re pretty sure there will be good food involved, as she’s really got her finger on the pulse of what’s trending on NYC’s food scene.

This is the makeup chart next to the final execution on Emma. The thinking behind the red eye makeup and blue lips is taking the stereotypical woman’s makeup of red lipstick and blue eyeshadow, and switching features, as a symbol of rebellion.

I was inspired by other artists in The Val Garland School of Makeup to title my idea for this editorial. The brief is “Youth Now”, but I think I would call this: “Youth Now: Live Forever”.  Generally, young people have that zest for life and adulthood that you can sometimes lose as you get older. In general, they don’t have quite as many responsibilities or attachments that hold them back from living every moment to the fullest. On the other hand, the general societal pressures and ideas about the state of the world, also leads youth to have a “live now, worry later” attitude- always reaching for what is the most fun, wildest thing they can do at any moment.  This doesn’t necessarily lead to productivity, it can be laziness that is the chosen activity. Leisure. Living beyond your means to make every moment the exact way you want. Satisfying your whims. That can be youth now, too. When you’re young, you feel like you’re going to live forever and you can do anything. When you’re young in 2015, you do whatever you can, however you can, to keep yourself engaged and satiated, and distracted from the negative. Youth Now: Short Attention Span Lifestyle. Or, as I like to call it: “Shiny Penny Syndrome”. Go wherever the pretty fun things are.  We explored both sides in our shoot with Emma.  The hopeful, exuberant side, and the “I don’t care, as long as I’m having a good time” side.  They both have their merits.  Check them out below.

One of the favorite final images for the i-D Magazine Brief.  Model: Emma Mannheimer, Photo: Ben Trivett

One of the favorite final images for the i-D Magazine Brief. Model: Emma Mannheimer, Photo: Ben Trivett

The final image we selected:

The final image selection for i-D Magazine.  Model: Emma Mannheimer, Photo: Ben Trivett

The final image selection for i-D Magazine. Model: Emma Mannheimer, Photo: Ben Trivett